Research partnerships

Australian Institute of Sport

The AIS is Australia’s premier sports training institute. Its aim is to provide outstanding athlete results combined with skilled coaches, world-class facilities and cutting-edge sports science and sports medicine services. This has given the AIS its international reputation as a world’s best practice model for high performance athlete development. The AIS is actively working to develop better results for athletes and to reduce the occurrence of injury and recovery times. The AIS Strategy is the achieve Sustained International Sporting Success through support of National Sporting Organisations, State and Regional Academies and Institutes of Sport and individual athletes. The AIS sport science and sports medicine programs strive to improve performance and reduce injuries and illness in athletes. Understanding the molecular basis of injury and illness supports the organisational goal to reduce injuries by allowing modification of training loading and environments where injury risk is identified as high.

Bond University Contact:
CRN for Advancing Exercise & Sports Science

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University of Queensland Diamantina Institute

The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute (UQDI) has a particular focus on severe and chronic diseases such as cancer and diseases involving the immune system, including arthritis, chronic infections, and diabetes. Analysis of high performance athletes provides a new sub-population for the Diamantina Institute, which has previously focused on general population studies in relation to disease and illness. The Institute's major focuses are immunology, genomic medicine, and cancer biology research. UQDI has major research programs in bone and joint diseases such as osteoporosis and arthritis, including the study of genetic, immunological and metabolic factors involved.

Bond University Contact:
Bon Gray

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University of Sydney

The mission of the Exercise, Health & Performance research group at the University of Sydney, led by Professor Maria Fiatarone Singh, is to optimise human potential via an enhanced understanding and application of the principles and practice of human movement, physical activity, exercise performance, and related lifestyle factors including nutrition and sleep. The anticipated individual, societal, and global benefits of this expanded knowledge base and its translation and implementation in the community include enhanced athletic performance, health promotion, prevention and treatment of chronic disease and disability, and improved rehabilitation from injury throughout the lifespan.

This mission at USYD is in complete alignment with the vision of the proposed CRN to forge collaborative ties amongst its partner institutions in pursuit of emerging research excellence in genomic and molecular contributions to exercise capacity and adaptation in cohorts ranging from elite athletes to frail elders.

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